UMS
Friday, February 16, 2018 5:30 PM // Hill Auditorium

Kaleidoscope: What is Cultural Appropriation?

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How do we share and borrow from one another, and where are the lines between representation, glorification, appreciation, and appropriation?

A student performing arts forum that asks “What is Appropriate?” How do we share and borrow from one another and where is the line between representation, glorification, appreciation, and appropriation?

 

Join us for a cultural sharing like nothing else on campus! From Southeast Asian Dance to Korean Pop from Gospel to Spoken Word. We will have food, performances by students from all over campus/the world, and most importantly an open safe dialogue about what is appropriate. Hope to see you there!

 

Food will be provided by Cuppy’s Best Soul Food *Please support Black Owned Businesses

 

Open Forum Conversation Facilitator

Morgan Breon kick-started her theater career playing 15 of the 16 characters featured in Nilaja Sun’s, “No Child” at Matrix Theatre Company. Morgan is an ensemble member of Shakespeare in Detroit and has played the following roles: Lord/ Lady Capulet (Romeo and Juliet), Ariel (The Tempest), Marc Antony (Julius Caesar), and Shylock (Merchant of Venice). In 2015, Morgan played Oriel in the world premiere of “A Kiss of the Sun for Pardon” at the Detroit Repertory Theater. She is an alumnus of Mosaic Youth Theater in Detroit, University of Michigan’s CRLT Players, and the U-M Educational Theater Company. At 13, Morgan wrote “Portrait of A Wise Woman,” in honor of her late grandmother, Janie Withrow. Upon reprising the play 13 years later, it won “Audience Favorite” in the 2015 Two Muses Women’s Playwriting Festival. Her stage play, “Waking Up Alive” won the “Jury Award” at the 2015 Detroit Fringe Festival and she was a 2017 Mitten Lab Fellow for Playwriting, where her stage play was performed by students at Interlochen Center for the Arts. Morgan received a dual Bachelor of Arts and dual Masters from the University of Michigan, none of which are in theatre. Her degrees reflect her passion for youth, social justice, as well as individual and community healing. These principles influence Morgan’s work as an artist, and guide her use of the arts to impact community. Morgan honors her late Auntie Margaret for investing in her artistic nature as a young girl. Morgan credits Jesus Christ with her gift of anything creative.

Performers include

Flowdom
Established in 2015, Flowdom is a co-ed and multicultural Hip Hop dance group that is open to different genres of music and styles of dance. We aim to put on entertaining choreographed performances, whilst incorporating freestyle dancing in order to develop unique style and flow. All the while, we make a legitimate effort to socialize outside of our scheduled sessions to collectively evolve as a group.

Michigan Wolveraas
Michigan Wolveraas is dedicated to preserving the Indian culture through the vibrant dance form of Raas. We work to promote diversity and spread awareness of our traditions by performing on and off campus. We are primarily a competitive dance team that travels across the nation from nation.

Michigan Gospel Chorale

“God has given us power to be His witnesses in the earth and we are co-missioned to ignite a fire that will influence the U of M campus and, ultimately, the world! Although God’s word never changes, His methods of outreach do, and through the God-given ministries of sinigng, dance, mime and sign interpretations, it is our prayer that God will use us to bring the Gospel of Christ to the darkness of the world.”

Yoni Ki Baat
YKB promotes social justice issues pertaining to South Asian women and all Women of Color, most notably through its annual monologue show. Inspired by the Vagina Monologues, the YKB show provides a platform for women on campus to share their stories about topics that may be culturally taboo or infrequently brought up. Guaranteed to make the audience laugh and cry, the YKB show also seeks to educate and enlighten the campus about the joys, challenges, and experiences of women of color on this campus. All proceeds are donated to a domestic violence shelter that specializes in addressing the needs of South Asian survivors.

Michigan Sahāna
Michigan Sahāna strives to create a thriving and active Indian classical music and dance community at the University of Michigan.

 

MUSKET
MUSKET is the largest completely student run musical theatre company on campus of the University of Michigan. Everything from directing to stage crew is done by students.

 

Plus Shaunie Lewis & Gian Perez, Olivia Johnson, Allie Taylor & Lindsey Sharpe, Cozine Welch, Johanna Kepler and company performing “Through our Eyes”

2/16/18 5:30 PM
Hill Auditorium

Kaleidoscope: What is Cultural Appropriation?

DETAILS

How do we share and borrow from one another, and where are the lines between representation, glorification, appreciation, and appropriation?

A student performing arts forum that asks “What is Appropriate?” How do we share and borrow from one another and where is the line between representation, glorification, appreciation, and appropriation?

 

Join us for a cultural sharing like nothing else on campus! From Southeast Asian Dance to Korean Pop from Gospel to Spoken Word. We will have food, performances by students from all over campus/the world, and most importantly an open safe dialogue about what is appropriate. Hope to see you there!

 

Food will be provided by Cuppy’s Best Soul Food *Please support Black Owned Businesses

 

Open Forum Conversation Facilitator

Morgan Breon kick-started her theater career playing 15 of the 16 characters featured in Nilaja Sun’s, “No Child” at Matrix Theatre Company. Morgan is an ensemble member of Shakespeare in Detroit and has played the following roles: Lord/ Lady Capulet (Romeo and Juliet), Ariel (The Tempest), Marc Antony (Julius Caesar), and Shylock (Merchant of Venice). In 2015, Morgan played Oriel in the world premiere of “A Kiss of the Sun for Pardon” at the Detroit Repertory Theater. She is an alumnus of Mosaic Youth Theater in Detroit, University of Michigan’s CRLT Players, and the U-M Educational Theater Company. At 13, Morgan wrote “Portrait of A Wise Woman,” in honor of her late grandmother, Janie Withrow. Upon reprising the play 13 years later, it won “Audience Favorite” in the 2015 Two Muses Women’s Playwriting Festival. Her stage play, “Waking Up Alive” won the “Jury Award” at the 2015 Detroit Fringe Festival and she was a 2017 Mitten Lab Fellow for Playwriting, where her stage play was performed by students at Interlochen Center for the Arts. Morgan received a dual Bachelor of Arts and dual Masters from the University of Michigan, none of which are in theatre. Her degrees reflect her passion for youth, social justice, as well as individual and community healing. These principles influence Morgan’s work as an artist, and guide her use of the arts to impact community. Morgan honors her late Auntie Margaret for investing in her artistic nature as a young girl. Morgan credits Jesus Christ with her gift of anything creative.

Performers include

Flowdom
Established in 2015, Flowdom is a co-ed and multicultural Hip Hop dance group that is open to different genres of music and styles of dance. We aim to put on entertaining choreographed performances, whilst incorporating freestyle dancing in order to develop unique style and flow. All the while, we make a legitimate effort to socialize outside of our scheduled sessions to collectively evolve as a group.

Michigan Wolveraas
Michigan Wolveraas is dedicated to preserving the Indian culture through the vibrant dance form of Raas. We work to promote diversity and spread awareness of our traditions by performing on and off campus. We are primarily a competitive dance team that travels across the nation from nation.

Michigan Gospel Chorale

“God has given us power to be His witnesses in the earth and we are co-missioned to ignite a fire that will influence the U of M campus and, ultimately, the world! Although God’s word never changes, His methods of outreach do, and through the God-given ministries of sinigng, dance, mime and sign interpretations, it is our prayer that God will use us to bring the Gospel of Christ to the darkness of the world.”

Yoni Ki Baat
YKB promotes social justice issues pertaining to South Asian women and all Women of Color, most notably through its annual monologue show. Inspired by the Vagina Monologues, the YKB show provides a platform for women on campus to share their stories about topics that may be culturally taboo or infrequently brought up. Guaranteed to make the audience laugh and cry, the YKB show also seeks to educate and enlighten the campus about the joys, challenges, and experiences of women of color on this campus. All proceeds are donated to a domestic violence shelter that specializes in addressing the needs of South Asian survivors.

Michigan Sahāna
Michigan Sahāna strives to create a thriving and active Indian classical music and dance community at the University of Michigan.

 

MUSKET
MUSKET is the largest completely student run musical theatre company on campus of the University of Michigan. Everything from directing to stage crew is done by students.

 

Plus Shaunie Lewis & Gian Perez, Olivia Johnson, Allie Taylor & Lindsey Sharpe, Cozine Welch, Johanna Kepler and company performing “Through our Eyes”

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