UMS
Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:00 PM // Michigan Theater

The Bad Plus
Joshua Redman

On paper, the partnership of Joshua Redman and the Bad Plus seems unlikely.

The saxophonist was embraced by the jazz mainstream on the release of 1994’s Moodswing, and he’s been both a critical and commercial favorite ever since. The Bad Plus, by contrast, have courted controversy since the release of their 2003 major label debut, These Are the Vistas. But when Joshua Redman joined the idiosyncratic trio as a special guest a few years back, a brilliant collaboration was born. Redman’s melodic prowess blends seamlessly with the “avant-garde populism” of The Bad Plus, pushing the boundaries of jazz beyond all imagination. Metroland describes this new all-star quartet best: “It’s as though Redman is the long-lost fourth member of the group, just waiting to be snapped snugly into place. Imagine if the Beatles had spent the first decade of their career as a trio before adding Paul. It’s like that.”

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From the UMS Lobby Blog

UMS LOBBY

What Makes a Great Jazz Trio?

What do the Bad Plus, Luciana Souza Trio, and the Schubert Piano Trios have in common? They are a trio of trios coming to Ann Arbor in February, but that’s where the similarities end. While one of these trios plays the chamber music of 19th-century composer Franz Schubert, the other two might be classified as jazz trios. Yet, neither fits traditional notions of a jazz trio. In this blog post I set out to explore "the art of the trio.” Specifically, I set out to ask: what makes a great jazz trio?

4/23/16 8:00 PM
Michigan Theater

The Bad Plus
Joshua Redman

DETAILS

On paper, the partnership of Joshua Redman and the Bad Plus seems unlikely.

The saxophonist was embraced by the jazz mainstream on the release of 1994’s Moodswing, and he’s been both a critical and commercial favorite ever since. The Bad Plus, by contrast, have courted controversy since the release of their 2003 major label debut, These Are the Vistas. But when Joshua Redman joined the idiosyncratic trio as a special guest a few years back, a brilliant collaboration was born. Redman’s melodic prowess blends seamlessly with the “avant-garde populism” of The Bad Plus, pushing the boundaries of jazz beyond all imagination. Metroland describes this new all-star quartet best: “It’s as though Redman is the long-lost fourth member of the group, just waiting to be snapped snugly into place. Imagine if the Beatles had spent the first decade of their career as a trio before adding Paul. It’s like that.”

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UMS LOBBY

What Makes a Great Jazz Trio?

What do the Bad Plus, Luciana Souza Trio, and the Schubert Piano Trios have in common? They are a trio of trios coming to Ann Arbor in February, but that’s where the similarities end. While one of these trios plays the chamber music of 19th-century composer Franz Schubert, the other two might be classified as jazz trios. Yet, neither fits traditional notions of a jazz trio. In this blog post I set out to explore "the art of the trio.” Specifically, I set out to ask: what makes a great jazz trio?

COMMENTS