UMS
Thursday, February 16, 2017 5:10 PM // Michigan Theater

Penny Stamps Lecture Series: Ping Chong

Photo credit: Adam Nadel

Ping Chong is an American contemporary theater director, playwright, choreographer, video and installation artist whose multimedia productions examine cultural and ethnic differences and pressing social issues of the moment.

Ping Chong is perhaps best known for his ongoing series Undesirable Elements, an ongoing exploration of the experience of outsiders that is recrafted for each city in which it is performed. Drawing on documentary and interview-based materials, over 40 different versions have been performed in communities all over the United States, Europe and in Japan. Chong has been the recipient of numerous honors, including an Obie Award for Sustained Achievement (2000), the Doris Duke Artist Award for Theatre (2013), and the National Medal of Arts (2014), presented by President Barack Obama.

Ping Chong + Company’s Beyond Sacred: Voices of Muslim Identity is at Power Center on Saturday, February 18.

Established with the generous support of alumna Penny W. Stamps, the Speaker Series brings respected innovators from a broad spectrum of fields to the School to conduct a public lecture and engage with students, faculty, and the larger U-M and Ann Arbor communities.

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2/16/17 5:10 PM
Michigan Theater

Penny Stamps Lecture Series: Ping Chong

DETAILS

Ping Chong is an American contemporary theater director, playwright, choreographer, video and installation artist whose multimedia productions examine cultural and ethnic differences and pressing social issues of the moment.

Ping Chong is perhaps best known for his ongoing series Undesirable Elements, an ongoing exploration of the experience of outsiders that is recrafted for each city in which it is performed. Drawing on documentary and interview-based materials, over 40 different versions have been performed in communities all over the United States, Europe and in Japan. Chong has been the recipient of numerous honors, including an Obie Award for Sustained Achievement (2000), the Doris Duke Artist Award for Theatre (2013), and the National Medal of Arts (2014), presented by President Barack Obama.

Ping Chong + Company’s Beyond Sacred: Voices of Muslim Identity is at Power Center on Saturday, February 18.

Established with the generous support of alumna Penny W. Stamps, the Speaker Series brings respected innovators from a broad spectrum of fields to the School to conduct a public lecture and engage with students, faculty, and the larger U-M and Ann Arbor communities.

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