UMS
Friday, March 24, 2017 8:00 PM // Hill Auditorium

Mitsuko Uchida, piano

Mitsuko Uchida has long devoted much attention to the mainstream German and Viennese repertoire, but she also takes a keen interest in the music of today.

She opens her first UMS concert since her 1998 debut with a delicate Mozart sonata, and rounds it out with the US premiere of a new work by the German composer Jörg Widmann. Two Schumann masterpieces, including Kreisleriana, a wildly inventive set of pieces inspired by characters from E.T.A. Hoffmann’s works, and his Fantasy in C Major, penned as a love song to his future wife, complete the program.

PROGRAM

Mozart Sonata in C Major, K. 545
Schumann Kreisleriana, Op. 16
Widmann Sonatina facile (U.S. Premiere)
Schumann Fantasy in C Major, Op. 17

PRESENTING SPONSORS

SUPPORTING SPONSORS

  • Randall and Nancy Faber and the Faber Piano Institute
  • Ken and Penny Fischer
  • Ann and Clayton Wilhite
  • Bob and Marina Whitman

MEDIA PARTNERS

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University Connections

Taking your university class to this performance? Explore suggested curricular ties for this performance, both by department and by key topics and themes. We've also curated dialogue prompts to spark in-class discussion and links to high-quality contextual materials online.

3/24/17 8:00 PM
Hill Auditorium

Mitsuko Uchida, piano

DETAILS

Mitsuko Uchida has long devoted much attention to the mainstream German and Viennese repertoire, but she also takes a keen interest in the music of today.

She opens her first UMS concert since her 1998 debut with a delicate Mozart sonata, and rounds it out with the US premiere of a new work by the German composer Jörg Widmann. Two Schumann masterpieces, including Kreisleriana, a wildly inventive set of pieces inspired by characters from E.T.A. Hoffmann’s works, and his Fantasy in C Major, penned as a love song to his future wife, complete the program.

PROGRAM (Fri 3/24/2017: Hill Auditorium)

Mozart Sonata in C Major, K. 545
Schumann Kreisleriana, Op. 16
Widmann Sonatina facile (U.S. Premiere)
Schumann Fantasy in C Major, Op. 17
SPONSORS

PRESENTING SPONSORS

SUPPORTING SPONSORS

  • Randall and Nancy Faber and the Faber Piano Institute
  • Ken and Penny Fischer
  • Ann and Clayton Wilhite
  • Bob and Marina Whitman

MEDIA PARTNERS

BLOG

UMS LOBBY

University Connections

Taking your university class to this performance? Explore suggested curricular ties for this performance, both by department and by key topics and themes. We've also curated dialogue prompts to spark in-class discussion and links to high-quality contextual materials online.

COMMENTS